How to delete a Facebook group

Want to delete a Facebook group that you created but can’t work out how? Here’s what you need to do – it’s straightforward once you know.

Go to the page of the group that you administrate. Click ‘Edit members’ in the left-hand menu. Delete all members until it’s just yourself left in the group. Return to the main group page and choose ‘Leave group’. A window will appear advising that you’re the last member and that if you leave, it will be deleted. Confirm!

I think it’s time for Facebook to add a ‘Close group’ option for group administrators – it would be much more user friendly…

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Useful tools: Delicious

In the second of this (very) occasional series about things I use to help me work, I want to talk about Delicious. It’s been around for a while, and indeed I’ve been using it since I started up as a freelancer. Its staying power can only be a good thing!

It’s ideal for keeping track of all those handy articles I find and read (or intend to read…), as well as sharing them via my websites. However, it was only at the weekend when I had a bit of a fiddle around with it that I discovered some handy features.

From many to one

Previously, I had a Delicious account for each of my blogs (which proliferate faster than I can keep up), with a different log-in for each. In addition, since Yahoo bought Delicious, many of these now have Yahoo log-ins instead.

Fed up with all these different usernames and passwords (plus I don’t use Yahoo for anything else), I decided to bring all my bookmarks (both public and private) under my …

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Social Media Day, Palma – 30 June 2010

Last Wednesday I pottered into lovely Palma de Mallorca to be part of Mashable’s Social Media Day. There’s not a very big local networking scene locally (except for TwittPalma) so I thought I should make the most of it.

Of course, it was a Spanish event that also attracted some English speakers like myself. And herein lies the problem with lots of networking events – it’s scary speaking to new people. And if they speak a different language you’re not fluent in? Even more so.

Love people, dislike networking

I’m not really a fan of networking; it all feels a bit unnatural and, as far as I’m concerned, it’s a necessary evil. But conversely, I love meeting new people and talking with them. But not about work. And especially not in a forced way…

So, as often happens, people kept to the groups (of very lovely people, of course) that they knew. Next time, I think the ‘social’ aspect of the event should be harnessed, maybe in a ‘speed …

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Learning languages online

As if I needed another distraction, this week I discovered Busuu.com. It calls itself a ‘language learning community’ and is basically another social network with a twist: you create a profile for yourself and add details of the languages you’re learning.

Busuu.com offers courses in English, Spanish, French, German and Italian at the moment. As well as providing units in vocabulary and grammar, it also prompts you to submit a short writing exercise that other members can then check and correct.

Improved site tools and features

This is a great little tool for language learners and much better than anything else I’ve found online so far. I’m not sure how old the website is, but I’m guessing it will of course be further developed.

A few things that I’d like to see are:

an improved search tool that lets users search using a keyword — I’d like to make ‘friends’ with people in my locality, not just my country downloads (PDFs and podcasts) with more detail and exercises than just those found in that unit — these …

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Picture it: Flukle

An email popped into my inbox this morning about another social media tool, Flukle. I don’t remember signing up to receive information but that doesn’t mean a thing – there seems to be something new every week. But I digress…

With Flukle, you can ‘share where you are, and what you’re doing, in real-time, through photos’. I’m not sure if I’m missing something but this sounds a lot like Twitter with pictures to me. Hang on; that is Twitter, isn’t it?

However, I guess you don’t need to trawl through the reams of text to get to the images. This could potentially be a great tool for furthering photo journalism. Caption the photos so that people can search by a keyword and instant images of anything that’s happening in the world.

As long as, of course, someone’s added it.

I’m not going to register for this for now (after all, there are only so many photos of my home office that are worth looking at), but it’ll be interesting to see how Flukle takes off. Have you …

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Social media: not so shiny anymore

Because I’m a web copywriter, it’s almost an obligation to be involved with social media. It’s one of those things that we should understand and ‘get’. I have profiles on the standard hat trick of networks: Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. And I’m starting to get a bit, well, bored. Of (gasp) Twitter in particular.

It’s a bit like a relationship that seems great at first, then gets a bit dull, until finally you realise you’re putting a lot in, but not getting much back. You really thought you would, of course, and you’ve ‘met’ (hey, let’s not forget this is virtual) some really nice people…

But I only use it for business; unless the person’s an extraordinary writer, I really don’t want to know what people are doing right now. I’ve made some interesting contacts, but now I read their blogs, not their Tweets.

I’ve tried to provide useful links for my ‘followers’, which has worked as their number has grown organically and they say nice things to me (yes, that’s certainly one of the good points). But while this …

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Twitter: still misunderstood by many

I’ve just read yet another article on Twitter: an insight into the goings on at the company’s San Francisco headquarters. While it was interesting enough, I certainly agree that the media’s been saturated with Twitter stories recently. As with any topic repeatedly reported on, people are getting a bit, well, bored of it all.

So, the comments left by readers at the end of the piece were not a surprise. However, they did show that despite all of this coverage (and the millions that use it already), many people still don’t really understand Twitter and how it can be used.

I really don’t care what most of the 35million people who have Twitter are doing in their everyday lives, whether they can put it into 140 or 20 words, I don’t want to read about it.

I just don’t get it. why would I be egotistical enough to think anybody would be interested in my random thoughts?

It’s a site where you can post a status, this has …

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What makes a successful Facebook group?

When I logged onto Facebook this morning, I spotted that two of my friends had joined a new group. The group name caught my attention: ‘Stop the usage of dogs as live bait for sharks!’. Curious (and slightly sceptical), I took a look.

Creating a sense of credibility

The group has a well-written description:

Innocent dogs are being dragged behind boats and used as LIVE bait for sharks!! Defend the rights of animals! We are asking that the French Government ensure that this never happens again. […] INVITE ALL YOUR FRIENDS. EVERYONE NEEDS TO KNOW HOW SO MANY DOGS ARE KILLED EACH YEAR!

There is a photo of an injured dog, the description offers a link to a ‘…video that shows one poor dog being rescued’, and the administrators also appear to be genuine. All of these factors combine to create a credible-looking cause, which, at the time of writing, is supported by 1,208,122 members.

But digging deeper…

Looking beyond the facts above suggests slightly less than …

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Commenting, manners and etiquette

Lots of us have done it: we ‘read’ a post or an article that we disagree with in some way, then leave a hasty comment before speeding off to some other task. More often than not, this takes on a different tone than you intended. So what is correct etiquette when leaving a comment?

I started thinking about this yesterday, after doing exactly what I describe above. I followed a link in an e-newsletter and read the article (about unscrupulous SEO practices) like a typical web user: scanning for bits of interest, jumping from header to header.

How (not) to comment

I disagreed with several elements, so I left what I thought was a level, reasonable comment:

I think that many businesses do not understand what SEO is and how it can actually benefit their business. While ‘black hat’ SEO practices do exist and are unethical, this is a missed opportunity to explain what SEO is, how it can help small businesses and provide some positive tips, rather than focusing on …

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